Take Out Style Chinese Spare Ribs (Take 2)

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Have you ever cooked something that actually tastes a lot better the next day? Well these Chinese restaurant takeout style spare ribs are a perfect case. A few months back, we posted a recipe for these ribs. We decided to post it again using the second half of the BBQ sauce that we’d saved from the last rib recipe. The flavors actually intensify over time and really meld together, so don’t worry about making too much! In fact, sometimes we’ll double the sauce recipe and just keep it around for later. It will keep for a few months in an airtight container in the fridge.

This time, we used baby back ribs because they’re a bit more tender. It’s all personal preference, of course, but we like these “fun size” spare ribs. They also marinate quicker. Rather than letting them sit overnight, leave them for 4-6 hours. Just add more sauce so that it’s more concentrated. At the Holiday Inn, when we would have a run on ribs, we would marinate them faster by packing on more sauce also. Just brush off some of the extra sauce before putting them in the oven.

Take a look at Judy’s Jasmine Tea Rub Ribs for a more exotic yet tasty rib recipe that will also delight your taste buds!

So without further ado, here’s the recipe:

  • 5 cloves freshly minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon minced sweet pineapple
  • 1 star anise – ground in a mortar and pestle
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 5 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 2 tablespoons hoisin sauce
  • 1 teaspoon ground bean sauce
  • 2 tablespoons tomato puree, or 1 tablespoon tomato paste mixed with 1 tablespoon water
  • 5 tablespoons ketchup
  • ½ tablespoon 5 spice powder
  • 2 tablespoons fresh squeezed juice from a tangerine or orange
  • 1 teaspoon fresh ground pepper
  • ½ tablespoon paprika
  • 2-3 racks baby back ribs

Stir together all the ingredients from the garlic to the paprika to make the BBQ sauce. In a zip-loc bag, add the ribs and half the sauce. Either marinate them overnight, or for 4-6 hours with a little extra sauce. Store the leftover sauce for later use.

Preheat your oven to 325 degrees. Prepare a roasting pan lined with heavy duty foil for easy clean-up. Add about 2 cups of water to the pan so there is about a half inch of water. Place a roasting rack on top of the pan and place your spare ribs on the rack (rib side up) and place in your preheated oven.

Roast for 30 minutes. Flip the racks over and roast for another 45-60 minutes. Add water to the roasting pan as the water dries up during the roasting process. If you like, you can finish them with a couple minutes under the broiler.

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TAKEOUT STYLE CHINESE SPARE RIBS (TAKE 2)

Prep Time: 6 hours

Cook Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Total Time: 7 hours, 30 minutes

TAKEOUT STYLE CHINESE SPARE RIBS (TAKE 2)

Ingredients

5 cloves freshly minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced sweet pineapple
1 star anise – ground in a mortar and pestle
1 tablespoon salt
5 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons peanut oil
2 tablespoons hoisin sauce
1 teaspoon ground bean sauce
2 tablespoons tomato puree, or 1 tablespoon tomato paste mixed with 1 tablespoon water
5 tablespoons ketchup
½ tablespoon 5 spice powder
2 tablespoons fresh squeezed juice from a tangerine or orange
1 teaspoon fresh ground pepper
½ tablespoon paprika
2-3 racks baby back ribs

Stir together all the ingredients from the garlic to the paprika to make the BBQ sauce. In a zip-loc bag, add the ribs and half the sauce. Either marinate them overnight, or for 4-6 hours with a little extra sauce. Store the leftover sauce for later use.

Preheat your oven to 325 degrees. Prepare a roasting pan lined with heavy duty foil for easy clean-up. Add about 2 cups of water to the pan so there is about a half inch of water. Place a roasting rack on top of the pan and place your spare ribs on the rack (rib side up) and place in your preheated oven.

Roast for 30 minutes. Flip the racks over and roast for another 45-60 minutes. Add water to the roasting pan as the water dries up during the roasting process. If you like, you can finish them with a couple minutes under the broiler.

http://thewoksoflife.com/2014/03/takeout-style-chinese-spare-ribs-take-2/

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Comments

  1. Thomas Venditto says

    Sorry, but this is all nonsense. I’m not saying that your recipe is bad, I’m saying that NO run-of-the-mill Chinese takeout does this, anywhere. I used to work at a Chinese restaurant as a kid and I remember half the story… I’m trying to figure out the rest.
    I can remember they used to keep whole racks of ribs in bus pans and “paint” them with duck sauce daily. They looked desiccated. It was my impression, they sat for days. When someone ordered ribs, they’d take a rack out and whack off a few and heat them under the broiler. They took the same time to cook as say, an egg roll. No pineapple, hoisin, fine spices . . . DUCK SAUCE, and people yapped ‘em up. They weren’t (aren’t) succulent and delicious. They are dried out and chewy. Personally, I LIKE them this way and am trying to duplicate the recipe. They’re reminiscent of jerky.
    What I’m trying to figure out is how they treat them before the bus pan thing; boiled? roasted? Definitely NOT grilled.
    Any takers?
    TomJV

    • says

      Hi Thomas, There are so many restaurants out there with different methods used over the years so I can’t comment on your specific experience. However, I assure you that most restaurants use more than just duck sauce. At least at my own family’s takeout restaurant, ribs were marinated overnight with our own sauce recipe, roasted in a batches in a standing oven and then transferred to a bus box after they were done. Once cooled, the ribs would be stored in the walk-in and reheated to order with more sauce brushed on and yes, it would take just a little longer to reheat under the broiler than it took to reheat an egg roll in the fryer.

      If you like them a bit dried and chewy, just follow the recipe, let the ribs cool off and place them in the refrigerator for a few days. Then reheat the rack on both sides under the broiler and you’ll replicate the taste. In fact, the upside to letting them sit is that the flavors really saturate the meat and the longer they sit, the more they will taste like jerky. All that said, I prefer to eat them right out of the oven! Thanks for sharing your experience.

  2. Dan says

    I was thinking about making these at a Memorial Day barbeque. Any tips on how to grill these? Thanks!

    • says

      Hi Dan,
      The best way to do these ribs on the grill is to cook them first in the oven at low heat, around 300 degrees for about an hour. You can do this the day before if you have a lot to do the day of the BBQ. Make sure you do put some water on the sheet pan at the bottom of the roasting pan so the ribs retain moisture. On the day of the BBQ, you can finish these on the grill and everyone will be impressed and ask how you got them so tender and soft!

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